A Cardinal on Rue Masson

This gorgeous red cardinal is seen all over our Canadian landscape, from the countryside to the urban playgrounds in our cities. I chose this particular bird because of what it represents – according to Spiritual Astrology, Tarot & Metaphysical Studies, the Cardinal represents renewed vitality and the recognition of self-importance.

Another element to my design is the flowers. All flowers have meanings associated with them and are a part of the most important occasions in our lives. They are conspicuously present on birthdays, funerals, graduation, weddings, etc. forming an integral part of our lives. Some flowers have religious significance too. In this case, the flowers I chose pertain to the spirit of Rue Masson – The Daffodil symbolizes regard and chivalry. It is indicative of rebirth, new beginnings and eternal life. A bunch of daffodils indicate joy and happiness. The Iris symbolizes eloquence and is symbolic of wisdom, faith and hope.

All these elements are framed and gathered while not restrained within a triangle. The design of a triangle is meant to guide your eye from left to right and upward. In a more spiritual significance, the triangle here is a symbol of strength and courage, elevating you, sending you upward toward the sky – rising above all!

My first painting of 2018.

My first painting this year – Black & Gold II, 2018

Also, the first of many in a small collection I’ll be doing for Judith Liegeois Designs in Naples. Florida.

I am beyond happy to be showing with her. I encourage everyone to visit her website at http://www.judithliegeoisdesigns.com and if you are in Naples, Florida, please drop in and visit her gallery. You’ll love it!

 

Wow. I’m in British Vogue Magazine.

This is HUGE!! VOGUE reached out to me for a feature on their Gallery Profile page in the October issue.

I am ecstatic over this…to be noticed by such a high profile magazine such as VOGUE has truly exceeded my wildest expectations. WOW!

My art is definitely not everyone’s cup of tea, but I’m sure happy it’s theirs!! Straight up EPIC. Thank you British Vogue for this fabulous opportunity.

Wow, Showing With Marie Saint Pierre

I was very excited to be featuring my latest work in collaboration with Montreal fashion icon, Marie Saint Pierre. The Maison Marie Saint Pierre presented “ACTE I: CAPSULE 30 ans”(June 2017), the thirty-year celebration of their brand and their newest fashion collection.

See it at: https://www.mariesaintpierre.com/ca_fr/actualites/capsule-30-ans/

She’s an award-winning pioneer in the Canadian fashion industry and a woman of many firsts. Marie was the first Quebec designer to participate at the Fashion Coterie of New York, and the first Canadian designer to present her collection in Paris. Marie’s awards range from Designer of the Year from Elle Quebec to recepient of the National Order of Canada.

Marie Saint Pierre’s collections are distributed in its two Montreal, Miami, online stores as well as in a multitude of sales outlets throughout North America.

Mad About It!

In the picture I am putting those final touches on my mural for MAD RADISH on Bank Street in the Glebe district of beautiful Ottawa.

Mad Radish is a new fast-casual salad concept, created by DAVIDsTEA founder David Segal. Serving chef-driven salads, soups and healthy snacks, they are bringing a new perspective to the salad category, emphasizing food that tastes as great as it makes you feel.

Their first two stores were opened in June 2017 in Ottawa, and they will be supporting them with community involvement, fun events and a donation partnership with Community Food Centres Canada.

I was glad to be part of it all. Thank You Mad Radishes.

Please visit their website, check out their menu, view more pictures of the mural and read the interview I did with them – https://www.madradish.com/blog/about-that-mural/

 

Sacred Geometry

I was very excited to submit this piece (36″x36″/ oil, gold enamel & silver leaf on canvas) for the FamaArt Fair during this year’s Mural Festival Élémentaire II, 2017

As an artist, I have always been fascinated by sacred geometry. It’s all around us, in nature, in architecture, in art, etc. It’s always there. Subliminally, we all see it. It defines our sense of what is beautiful. Our subconscious sees it; even if we don’t.

I have started to incorporate it in my paintings and murals in a visible, conscious way to show our eyes what our soul really sees. This new direction has been a kind of refuge for me.

The alchemical symbol for air is an upward-pointing triangle, bisected by a horizontal line and I have included this in my paintings. Painting these landscapes with wide-open skies has helped me to release emotion in a way that is particular to painting. It’s just you, some paint and a canvas. I love that alone time I have created for myself while painting. It’s my blessing, my refuge, my happiness…and I hope that the viewer feels that energy.

I hope that the viewer will ‘Stop’, even if for a moment to take a good deep breath. It will slow down your racing mind and soothe your pounding heart, I promise.

STOP and take a good, deep breath

Revisiting the elements in this piece I painted for @mumtl – Encan Soirée Bénéfice.

The alchemical symbol for air is an upward-pointing triangle, bisected by a horizontal line as seen here in my painting.

Given my current state, I felt it was important to paint something that reminded me to stop and just breathe. 
Life is hard at times, messy and complicated… I am notorious for never stopping and always pushing through it all without taking a minute for me – I thought we could all use a little reminder to STOP a second and take a good deep breath.

In fact, much of my work has focused on this recurring theme – the stillness of my birds, symbolizing awareness hopefully inspires reflection and reminds us all to stop and take the time to deal with our own thoughts, emotions, awareness and the blessings in our lives.

Hommage à Morrisseau

This is my latest mural, an hommage to Norval Morrisseau.

It was produced by @mumtl for @mbamtl special thanks to our partners for making it happen – arrondissement de Ville Marie, Ville de Montréal, Destination Centre- Ville, le Musée des beaux arts de Montréal and to my lovely assistant @corinne_lachance.

MU is a charitable non-profit organization whose mandate is to transform Montreal’s public spaces by creating murals that are rooted in local communities. MU’s projects are designed to promote the democratization of art and local development. Over the past seven years, MU has produced 70 large-scale murals in 15 neighbourhoods of Montreal.

In order to revitalize this heavily vandalized sector, MU initiated the creation of murals on the theme of fine art that have a graffiti or “street art” aesthetic. I was asked to do the first intervention, a stylistically influenced by Norval Morisseau, an artist whose works are held in the Museum of Fine Arts’ permanent collection.

Norval Morrisseau (1932 – 2007) was an Aboriginal Canadian artist. The subjects of his art were the myths and traditions of the Anishnaabe people, the cultural and political tensions between native Canadian and European traditions, his existential struggles, and his deep spirituality and mysticism. His style is characterized by thick black outlines and bright colors.

During his incarceration, he attended a local church where he was struck by the beauty of the images on stained-glass windows. Some of his paintings, like Indian Jesus Christ, imitate that style and represent characters from the Bible with native features.

He was known as the “Picasso of the North”. He founded the Woodlands School of Canadian art and was a prominent member of the “Indian Group of Seven”.

At the age of 19, Morrisseau became very sick. He was taken to a doctor but his health kept deteriorating. Fearing for his life, his mother called a medicine-woman who performed a renaming ceremony: She gave him the new name Copper Thunderbird.

According to Anishnaabe tradition, giving a powerful name to a dying person can give them new energy and save their lives. Morrisseau recovered after the ceremony and from then on always signed his works with his new name using Cree syllabics.