The Love of Cats and Dogs

I was very happy to do 2 murals for Vétérinaire LaSalle. It’s where art, design and medicine live. Dr. Bourrellis is the visionary and sole owner of the clinic since 2016.

As if her workload was not big enough, she decided to realize her dream – combining her two passions, art and veterinary medicine.

When she visited a commercial space in Place LaSalle, it was an empty box of 5000 sq. ft. and a 22 ft. high ceiling. She saw a beautiful blank canvas for her project and the future clinic took shape.

Supported by a great team of architect, entrepreneur and foreman, her the ideas were realized. From the murals at reception and in the treatment room, the skylights, the project of recovering old negatoscopes into “portraits”, by way of the kennel space for cats and the indoor bathroom for dogs; Dr. Bourrellis was allowed to give way to creativity and to work with local artisans to promote art and offer you a space out of the ordinary.

Thank you Dr. Bourrellis for trusting me with your “kings” and to Melanie Pittarelli for giving me a shoutout.

Thank you also to Gord Onck for your handsome dog Riley! Thank you also to Suzanna Assaf for your handsome cat Kai!

 

A Cardinal on Rue Masson

This gorgeous red cardinal is seen all over our Canadian landscape, from the countryside to the urban playgrounds in our cities. I chose this particular bird because of what it represents – according to Spiritual Astrology, Tarot & Metaphysical Studies, the Cardinal represents renewed vitality and the recognition of self-importance.

Another element to my design is the flowers. All flowers have meanings associated with them and are a part of the most important occasions in our lives. They are conspicuously present on birthdays, funerals, graduation, weddings, etc. forming an integral part of our lives. Some flowers have religious significance too. In this case, the flowers I chose pertain to the spirit of Rue Masson – The Daffodil symbolizes regard and chivalry. It is indicative of rebirth, new beginnings and eternal life. A bunch of daffodils indicate joy and happiness. The Iris symbolizes eloquence and is symbolic of wisdom, faith and hope.

All these elements are framed and gathered while not restrained within a triangle. The design of a triangle is meant to guide your eye from left to right and upward. In a more spiritual significance, the triangle here is a symbol of strength and courage, elevating you, sending you upward toward the sky – rising above all!

Mad About It!

In the picture I am putting those final touches on my mural for MAD RADISH on Bank Street in the Glebe district of beautiful Ottawa.

Mad Radish is a new fast-casual salad concept, created by DAVIDsTEA founder David Segal. Serving chef-driven salads, soups and healthy snacks, they are bringing a new perspective to the salad category, emphasizing food that tastes as great as it makes you feel.

Their first two stores were opened in June 2017 in Ottawa, and they will be supporting them with community involvement, fun events and a donation partnership with Community Food Centres Canada.

I was glad to be part of it all. Thank You Mad Radishes.

Please visit their website, check out their menu, view more pictures of the mural and read the interview I did with them – https://www.madradish.com/blog/about-that-mural/

 

Working along side OMEN – Popsilos

Wicked opportunity to be along side OMEN, a great artist and friend, at the silo in Vankleek Hill ON – part of the Popsilos project 2017.

Murals will be painted on a series of silos in Prescott-Russell. A committee that includes representatives from the tourism industry, agricultural community, the St-Albert Cheese Co-operative, the United Counties of Prescott-Russell and Popsilos co-producers Activar and A’Shop, selected the 5 winning silos among 10. This project is being funded by a $150,000 Canada 150 grant.

OMEN was chosen to complete the silo at The Vankleek Hill Vineyard at 3725 County Road 12 in Vankleek Hill (Hawkesbury East). OMEN will be painting a mural themed “Diversity”.

Marty Kral, owner of the organic winery – Vankleek Hill Vineyard said, “I think Popsilos is very cool and I am happy to be a part of it. It is a wonderful opportunity to share art and culture with those who make up our community at large.”

Marty and Laurie Kral bought farmland in 1991. Their property is a natural habitat that invites eagles, hawks and all types of birds to call it their home. Being an organic winery, an important thing for Marty in creating an ecosystem is for it to create the perfect natural chain that keeps his crop of grapes free from predators. He has snakes and rats and such that are all part of it. He even planted milkweed, which fosters a habitat for the endangered Monarch butterfly species who eat it and who need it for laying their eggs. This milkweed is also a great for pollinators such as bees. Marty and Laurie have a bee yard to call their own and they make their own honey.

They’ve created an absolute oasis of relaxation at the vineyard where you can have a drink of wine outside on their terrace and discover local cheese. They grow colder climate grapes such as Frontenac (red), Frontenac gris (white) and Servengy (red) and do everything from crushing to bottling their organic wines in-house.

Since the late 90′s, OMEN has been blurring the boundaries between graffiti and street art with his singular style of painting, both on and off the streets. Using spray cans as his primary medium, he has been leading the aerosol movement towards a truce with the established art world.

OMEN’s style is immediately recognizable, often cast in stark black and white his murals and canvases have a haunted quality about them. His use of negative space and ephemeral but controlled lines allows one to enter his paintings in a way that few street artists offer their viewers.

OMEN says, “as long as I’m painting with aerosol I hope that I can inspire a younger generation of artists to use the medium to push artistic boundaries and express themselves.”

Hommage à Morrisseau

This is my latest mural, an hommage to Norval Morrisseau.

It was produced by @mumtl for @mbamtl special thanks to our partners for making it happen – arrondissement de Ville Marie, Ville de Montréal, Destination Centre- Ville, le Musée des beaux arts de Montréal and to my lovely assistant @corinne_lachance.

MU is a charitable non-profit organization whose mandate is to transform Montreal’s public spaces by creating murals that are rooted in local communities. MU’s projects are designed to promote the democratization of art and local development. Over the past seven years, MU has produced 70 large-scale murals in 15 neighbourhoods of Montreal.

In order to revitalize this heavily vandalized sector, MU initiated the creation of murals on the theme of fine art that have a graffiti or “street art” aesthetic. I was asked to do the first intervention, a stylistically influenced by Norval Morisseau, an artist whose works are held in the Museum of Fine Arts’ permanent collection.

Norval Morrisseau (1932 – 2007) was an Aboriginal Canadian artist. The subjects of his art were the myths and traditions of the Anishnaabe people, the cultural and political tensions between native Canadian and European traditions, his existential struggles, and his deep spirituality and mysticism. His style is characterized by thick black outlines and bright colors.

During his incarceration, he attended a local church where he was struck by the beauty of the images on stained-glass windows. Some of his paintings, like Indian Jesus Christ, imitate that style and represent characters from the Bible with native features.

He was known as the “Picasso of the North”. He founded the Woodlands School of Canadian art and was a prominent member of the “Indian Group of Seven”.

At the age of 19, Morrisseau became very sick. He was taken to a doctor but his health kept deteriorating. Fearing for his life, his mother called a medicine-woman who performed a renaming ceremony: She gave him the new name Copper Thunderbird.

According to Anishnaabe tradition, giving a powerful name to a dying person can give them new energy and save their lives. Morrisseau recovered after the ceremony and from then on always signed his works with his new name using Cree syllabics.

 

Osheaga Arts and Music Festival

This year (2016 ), I was nominated for the 2016 Osheaga Arts and Music Festival. It’s a multi-day, indie, music festival that is held annually in the summer at Parc Jean-Drapeau on Île Sainte-Hélène in Montreal. I hope that you stopped by the Osheaga Arts Village to see what local artists created for the festival.

It was very exciting to be a part of this amazing festival once again this year working with En Masse Pour Les Masses on some bigger and even better installation works! Check out the visual artists line-up. It was great – Kirsten McCrea, Peru Dyer Jalea, Gracia Dyer Jalea,  Olivier Bonnard, Jorden David Doody and so many more!? Fred Caron killin’ it once again.

Osheaga has established itself as the most important festival of its genre in Canada. It attracts over 100 bands and over 135,000 music lovers from North America and Europe last year. Osheaga is also considered one of the best music events in the world in line with Coachella, Bonnaroo and Lollapalooza.

Pictured here is the mural I had the pleasure of doing for Osheaga. On the flip side – AIR element and celestial mapping done with nails and line wire in hot pink, of course.

It was an amazing experience with so many talented artists. A huge thanks to @fredifredfred for the opportunity, to @kway_official, @neweracap @newerator, @vanscanada for the awesome gear, to my boyz @earth_crusher, @peru143 for helping me reach the high spots and to master chef @chefchuckhughes for feeding us in Artist World all weekend- you put together an impressive spread.

The Osheaga music festival Montreal was an unforgettable time!

 

The Crow Takes Centre Stage

Wall art, public art, urban art or street art has evolved! It started as an underground movement linked to the hip-hop culture. At one time, it may have been called illegal art, graffiti art and even wall therapy.

Now, it’s international festivals in many major cities (Montreal, Lisbon, Los Angeles, Dallas, Lima, Buenos Aires and more), with artists who have fine-arts degrees. Google’s Art Project has dedicated a web site to Street Art. When the festivals are over, they leave behind revitalized neighbourhoods, more tourism and increased access to art in an engaging, open-air museum.

I have created a number of large-scale, street-art creations on walls in both Montreal an Miami both individually and collaboratively.

In 2015, I was humbled to be chosen as one of only 10 Quebec artists to participate in Montreal’s Mural International Art Festival. Another 10 artists were international talents. St-Laurent Blvd. was closed between Sherbrooke Street and Mount Royal Avenue for a record 11 days, as artists produced their works.

I chose to paint The Crow. I’ve been fascinated by crows since I was a child. They’re often regarded as evil omens, messengers of prophecy or even birds of death — I was trying to take that all away so people could see how amazingly beautiful crows really are. Hopefully, by allowing The Crow’s beauty to shine in happy, positive light and color, all our childhood fears would fall by the wayside. Then people might not be so negative about crows.

Thousands of visitors, aided by a site map (3522 St. Dominique, Montreal), admired the progress of the wall-works. They walked on their own or as part of guided tours that included films as well as visits to market stalls and street art galleries. Many Montrealers were introduced to my work and became fans. They captured The Crow on their phones and cameras and tweeted or re-tweeted it, facebooked it, blogged it or instagramed it. Carle Bernier-Genest, well-known blogger on his site, “C’est toi ma Ville”, writes about the City of Montreal – its beauty, pleasures, diversity and future. He said,”Le Corbeau de Melissa Del Pinto (MURAL 2015) est un véritable bijou. Elle réussit à nous faire admirer cet oiseau, qui autrement nous laisse indifférent, sinon craintif. Une œuvre, qui réussit à nous faire sortir du ‘cadre’ social habituel, est une œuvre importante.”

Many people stopped by personally to tell me how much they admired my work. On June 14, 2015 Bono was one of them. Bono is the lead vocalist of the rock band U2 as well as a singer-songwriter, musician, venture capitalist, businessman and internationally-renowned philanthropist.

Mural 2

Please visit my Street Art Gallery to see more!

“Fattal” Attraction

The Chromatic Festival was conceived as an annual Montréal arts party/festival designed to showcase art and artists. It organizes special events and takes art out of traditional spaces and introduces it into places that one might not expect.

In the summer of 2015, part of the Festival was held in Saint Henri area, near the Fattal lofts. The lofts are home to a variety of Montreal artists, many of those within the punk community and others hoping to preserve an alternative lifestyle.

I was invited to do a mural. Unfortunately, the festival organizers had not cleared the painting-over of the wall that was assigned to me. So, when I started prepping for my artwork, some people were understandably upset. Understandably, some local residents saw me as not respecting the art of the graffiti artist. The unwritten rule of graffiti artists is not to touch or vandalize public artwork.

I went ahead with my art piece and completed my Montreal Pigeon, a bird that is the standard in all major cities. The pigeon is in flight, raising the hopes, dreams and spirits of the Fattal community.

Sharing the Space

I noticed, a few months later, that the graffiti art had partly made its way back to the bottom of the wall. I am ok with that. The unknown graffiti artist repainted his art but also respected my pigeon. I see it as sharing the wall-space.

 

Please see more pictures by visiting my Street-Art Gallery.