My Birds up Close

People know my work best for my dramatic, large-scale paintings and murals of photorealistic birds. It’s a passion that I have had since childhood. However, it would be wrong to consider me a naturalist or wildlife artist. When I do a painting of a bird, I am not aiming for realism. I am trying to capture not only their image but the stillness of their souls. That stillness is meant to inspire reflection for those of us whose lives are in constant movement.

Visualization is key for me.  It is a kind of zen process. I have to see the painting as a completely finished piece, in my mind.  I establish the subject, the layout, the colors and the size… I even sometimes see it hung in a particular setting or establishment. If it’s street art, then I visualize it as part of the whole environment and everything around it.

When I do a painting of birds, I always start with the eyes because I feel like they need to communicate to me. I need to be able to relate or communicate with the subject and then it morphs from that point on. Because the bird is a single theme for me, I always put a plain background in a solid colour. I really want to emphasize the bird. I want its true character to shine through.

Birds have long been strong symbols for aboriginal people throughout the world. The crane has represented longevity, the owl wisdom, the parrot word magic, the cardinal power and enthusiasm, the canary illumination and the crow prophecy. Birds have also been symbols of spiritual growth or transcendence and man’s striving to attain that goal. Their flight has symbolized our own journey of release, renunciation, atonement and compassion.

For me, birds have always symbolized freedom and our awareness of our own forever-fleeting present. I feel that my paintings of birds not only show us the beauty of the bird itself but are also telling us to enjoy each of life’s individual moments – “Carpe diem; seize the day!”

In the painting pictured above, “The Merkaba in Flight”, I painted a Black-Capped Chickadee in flight. Behind it is the Star or Double Tetrahedron, also called the Merkaba, perhaps the most astounding geometric and all encompassing of all designs in Sacred Geometry. In early Jewish Mysticism, it was a vehicle (Merkavah) by which Ezekiel ascended into heaven. In Ancient Egypt, this primal pattern was called the Mer-Ka-Ba (Mer or light, Ka or soul, and Ba the body or reality) or rotating light that would take the spirit and the body from one world into another.

I hope that it touches you in some way.

I painted the Merkaba also in the Montreal offices of Shopify. In this high-tech environment, the Merkaba now becomes a symbol for personal and business growth and transcendence to a higher level.

To see more birds, please visit my Fine Art Gallery and my Studio Store! See the Shopify Merkaba in Commissions.

2 Responses

  1. So true. We all know that the dove represents peace and the eagle strength but most people are not aware of the rich meaning attached to many different birds, not only in aboriginal history but also in the Bible which contains approximately three hundred references to different birds. My favourite bird is the chickadee. It symbolizes clarity and purity of soul. What bird represents you best?

  2. I was trying to find my words to describe your bird paintings to my friend and you did it for me in this post. I was trying to tell my friend that your beautiful birds are caught in midair, suspended as if rising or being taken into heaven. But you said it for me – ” I am trying to capture not only their image but the stillness of their soul.” Your beautiful painting, The Merkaba, emphasizes that ascension of the bird into a different realm.

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